/t/ - Technology

Welcome to the WIRED

Posting mode: Reply
Visit J-List - Your Favorite Online Shop and Friend in Japan
Get the Newest Figures from J-List - Your Favorite Online Shop and Friend in Japan

[]
05/21/24 Happy birthday hikari3! (News post)
12/21/23 Recent news post: Check here. Also, new board added: /i/ - Oekaki.
11/25/23 Accepting banner submissions; check this thread for more details.
11/17/23 New blotter! Use this to keep an eye for small updates.
[Show All]


(30.81 KB 343x463 1711142457283841.jpg)

linux distros for beginners Anonymous 05/05/2024 (Sun) 00:43:35 No. 539
what distro of linux is the best for a beginner in linux?
>>
Linux Mint. I recommend xcfe version.
>>
none just use whatever and with time you will learn how most stuff works
>>
>you will learn how most stuff works spoiler: it doesn't, unless all you need is a browser and a mail client
>>
>>539 Why do you need Linux, that's the important question. If you just want to avoid Windows spyware and malware then just use Linux Mint or something, but be aware that Wine can run spyware/malware so I recommend having a separate computer running Windows just for games if you're a gaymer. If you want to be a "power user" and do advanced shit then I guess just use Linux Mint too, but also study the command line and stuff before switching to Gentoo or whatever.
>>
>>539 Install Gentoo
>>
>>539 Linux Mint is great if you just want to have a functioning replacement for Windows. Is playing video games all that you do with your PC? Install Bazzite instead. Want to actually learn how to use and modify your OS? Install Ubuntu.
>>
>>611 >Is playing video games all that you do with your PC? Install Bazzite instead. <install Literally What meme distro Are you one of the developers or someone paid by them? Anyway if literally all he does with a PC is playing games, Windows is the most suitable OS, there's no valid reason to use Linux in that case. >Want to actually learn how to use and modify your OS? Install Ubuntu. What? Ubuntu is built against that. It ships with a meme restrictive DE and meme systems like snaps. Unless you mean that OP will get so frustrated that he will be motivated to replace the system's components. Arch Linux is actually pretty great for that. It's not some super complicated hacker distro, it's pretty easy to figure out if you have enough IQ to read documentation and/or have some Linux experience.
>>
Linux Mint is the best imo, Ubuntu just kind of sucks
>>
Linux from Scratch. As a Linux beginner, you have the rare opportunity to delve deeply into the kernel, system architecture, and other interfaces with your machine without being waylaid by misconceptions, half-baked memes, and maladaptive habits more experienced users (even myself) undoubtedly pick up in their time. You can do things right the first time. Design a setup that will work best for you; the worst that can hapPENIS you change your mind, preferences revealed empirically in the face of work you've done yourself for your own benefit and to your own purpose. Forgetting the more autistically litigious aspects of the free software debate, the entire ethos is thus: taking control of the things that you do and should own. I'm being serious in making this recommendation, by the way. Its documentation has come very far from when I first discovered the project. It's only become more viable with time. Meanwhile, all the Debian and Arch clones continue to proliferate and splinter what could be more a "community" than many so-called down the line of small-difference narcissism and fixation on SystemD--note that I capitalize the D intentionally; the both literal and figurative intrusion into userspace cannot and must not be brooked and LFS is perhaps the best way to stave off such attempts at centralization and corporatization, putting as it does the power back in your hands by arming you with knowledge (and ensuring the continued survival of competing, independent alternatives. So long as each can be compiled from source and integrated into an environment, they'll live on). If you're not convinced by these arguments and care more for pragmatism, I'd still suggest LFS purely because in going through it you'll necessarily gain a ground-up appreciation for just how complex and integral something like a package manager is, preventing screwups of your own system and any you potentially administer. No one should DDoS the AUR by accident (looking at you, Manjaro team). So too will you have a broad, generalized base of understanding that will help you transition between distros and make a more discerning choice between them. There are no downsides if you can make the initial time commitment and, if you would forgive my tone, everyone here almost certainly has enough. Especially if some of the duller moments of the day were appropriated. Listless scrolling and thoughtless browsing could be reduced by just fifteen minutes a day and enable significant progress and eventual completion in as much time as it would take you to settle into some half-baked DE anyway.
>>
(26.92 KB 564x564 kawaii-cat.jpg)

>>627 Too long; didn't read. I'll keep using Arch with everything smoothly working and without having to waste 999 hours learning boring shit, and there's nothing you can do about it.
>>
>>612 I know this is hard for you to understand because of your crippling autism, but OP isn't you. OP is someone who most likely has never touched a Linux OS in his life. Bazzite is great for someone who just want to be able to game on Linux, because it has everything you need to immediately start gaming. If OP also wants to learn how to modify his OS, then Ubuntu is perfect for that precisely because it is so restrictive. He can start tinkering without worrying about the state of his kernel. Arch is a meme distro for people with too much time on their hands. It is good for nothing but endless configuring, because the end result is never perfect.
>>
>>630 >Arch is a meme distro for people with too much time on their hands. Arch is not a meme, but arch being a meme is a meme. Can we stop it? > It is good for nothing but endless configuring, I've been using my system for 3 years and I only configured things in the first few weeks and then settled down, only changing things every now and then. >because the end result is never perfect I don't even know what this is supposed to mean. You can just install a DE and some graphical tools and that's it, not any less "perfect" than other distros.
>>
>>636 arch updates literally used to overwrite my configuration files forcing me to use hooks to automatically restore configs. every second update was something to fix. nevermind that i never got aur package managers to work.
>>
>>638 I don't know what you're talking about. It's not like other distros and even normieOS like Windows and Mac don't have their own share of bugs. But at least Linux allows you to fix those bugs on your side yourself. >i never got aur package managers to work Sorry, the picture from the post you replied to really applies to this. It takes literally 5 minutes if you read documentation or watch a youtube video.
>>
>>640 >Sorry, the picture from the post you replied to really applies to this. It takes literally 5 minutes if you read documentation or watch a youtube video. sorry, when you package managers says me "sowwy i can't do what you ask me to because i don't know, something to do with dependencies", it's not something to be fixed by a youtube video. it's something to consider using another operational system.
>>
>>640 >But at least Linux allows you to fix those bugs on your side yourself. If you know how to do so, at least. The fact that most distros like Arch allow you to irreversibly break your OS makes it a no-go for most casual users. >It takes literally 5 minutes if you read documentation or watch a youtube video. Anon, you're intelligent. Most people in the world aren't. What takes you a few seconds to understand, could take someone else multiple days.
>>
>>644 >Anon, you're intelligent T...thank you.
>>
>>644 friendly reminder that using linux doesn't take intelligence. not even gentoo. it's pure grind. unqualified labor. low end job. most people just don't give a fuck enough to spend a year reading manuals. understandable, but irrelevant to intelligence
>>
>>647 I personally see patience as a strong indicator of intelligence, but I can see why you'd separate the two.
>>
>>648 >I personally see patience as a strong indicator of intelligence too bad for you
>>
>>649 I don't get it
>>
>>651 i figured as much. sorry nothing i can do for you even if i wanted
>>
really sorry i'm useless
>>
>>653 It's okay, anon. I'm here for you.
>>
(24.22 KB 120x203 maki.jpg)

I started with Debian, myself. Had a few hiccups but nothing serious. Tried a few others but I always ended up coming back to Debian. Mint might be easier from what I've heard.
>>
>>628 Is that really too long for you to read? I pity you...
>>
>>657 I like Debian too, it's one of those distros that seems to never break no matter what I do to it. I guess that's the whole point of Debian Stable. I spent some time with Mint but I didn't really like their Cinnamon DE very much. I know they have a MATE variant and a Debian-based variant but I haven't tried those yet because I've been happy with what I'm using (for now)
>>
Yes Debian is good. The only time I really hated it though was when I had to compile something from source. Ended up manually compiling a fuckton of libs, installing them in ~/.local and messing around with LD_LIBRARY_PATH and still was getting fucked out of blue. Uncool
>>
>>658 learn how to use paragraphs you baka
>>
>>661 >paragraphs such a waste of time how'd that guy do those shiny particles over his text???
>>
>>539 >what distro of linux is the best for a beginner in linux? all of them
>>
>>628 >Arch he actually uses systemd

Index Catalog Archive Top Reply

Posters: 20


Quick Reply